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JOINTS OF INTEREST IN "BOSTON 



1. King's Chapel and Burial Ground 

2. City Hall 

3. Granary Burial Ground 

4. Athenaeum 

5. Old Corner 

6. Old South Meeting House 

7. Post Office 

8. Old State House 

9. Faneuil Hall 
10. Quincy Market 



11. Custom House 

12. Paul Revere House 

13. Paul Revere Mall 

14. Christ Church 

15. Copps Hill 

16. Park St. Church 

17. St. Pauls Cathedral 

18. State House 

19. Court House 

20. Harrison Gray Otis House 

21. Old West Church 



22. The Shell 

23. Massachusetts General Hospital 

24. Public Library 

25. Trinity 

26. Christian Science Church 

27. Temple Israel 

28. Symphony Hall 

29. Museum of Fine Arts 

30. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum 

31. Massachusetts Historical Society 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/bostonbookOOforb 



The Boston Book 



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The Boston Book 



Photographs by Arthur Griffin 
Text by Esther Forbes 



Houghton Mifflin Company BostON 

tElit flibctsibc f)Tti« CambtiUge 




19 47 




F73. 









COPYBIGHT. 1947, BY ARTHUR L. GRIFFIN AND ESTHER FORBES HOSKINS 

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO REPRODUCE 
THIS BOOK OR PARTS THEREOF IN ANY FORM 



PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 



Many of the stones in Boston's old burying grounds are more than 
merely 'quaint.' Carvings and design are often beautiful and thoughtful. 
In no other mediimi did the Puritan express his attitudes toward life and 
death as consciously as in his stone carving. In the magnificence of the 
coats of arms, one reads his worldliness and pride. His use of the medieval 
symbols of hourglass, death's-head, skeletons, and scythe reflects his in- 
sistence upon the fact all flesh must die. Angels and cherubim give hope 
of immortality. The richness of decoration and the handsome printing 
show a love of sheer beauty rarely expressed anywhere else. 



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At the corner of School and Washington Streets is a gambrel-roofed brick 
building which goes back to 1712. Last left of many similar buildings (for 
old prints show that much of the present Washington Street was built up in 
this manner), it is interesting to look at, but difiBcult to photograph. 
Ticknor and Fields, publishers of Hawthorne, Emerson, Longfellow, 
Lowell, Whittier, did their business and received their authors and their 
manuscripts here. Partly because of 
Dickens's pleasant relationship with 
Ticknor and Fields, he said, 'The golden 
calf they worship in Boston is a pigmy 
compared with the giant eflBgies set up 
in other parts' of America. On the lower 
floor, the Old Corner Bookstore sold 
books for almost a hundred years. It 
was the focal point of the Hterary 
'Flowering of New England' in the last 
century. 



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Old South Meeting 



'A building with a grander history than any other on the American con- 
tinent, unless it he that other plain brick building in Philadelphia.' 

John Fiske 



when the American Revolution was brewing, Old South was the 
largest place for meetings in Boston, so it was here the most famous Town 
meetings in history were held — the one the day after the Boston Massacre 
and the one just before the Boston Tea Party. Here Sam Adams, address- 
ing the thousands crowded in the building and swarming about the streets, 
said. This meeting can do nothing more to save the country.' At this pre- 
arranged signal, yells went up from the dark galleries and darker streets, 
'Boston Harbor a teapot tonight,' and the Indians' were off for Griffin 
Wharf and Boston's most celebrated tea party. These brick walls have 
fairly bulged and trembled with patriotic speeches, shouts for freedom, 
prayers for liberty. No other early American church has had so political a 
history. Being such a hotbed of sedition, it fared badly while the British 
were occupying the town. Its pews were chopped up for soldier mess fires. 
Tanbark covered the floor, and it became a riding school for Burgoyne's 
Light Dragoons. As the young officers took their horses over the jumps, 
Tory belles admired from the galleries. 

Built in 1729, Old South is almost as famous architecturally as politically, 
for it had great influence on subsequent church design. Bare of ornament, 
dependent upon proportion for its effect, it is one of the finest of early 
American churches. It is no longer used as a church building. The interior 

has been restored and now 
houses the collections of The 
Old South Association. The 
large relief map of ancient Bos- 
ton (showing streets and houses) 
helps modem curiosity to realize 
what the cramped little town of 
fifteen hundred inhabitants was 
like two hundred years ago. 

That clock (Gaven Brown's 
masterpiece) has been ticking 
above Washington Street for to- 
ward two hundred years. 




10 




'Around the comer in Court Street is the famous steaming kettle above 
the sidewalk which advertises another coffee stall. . . . Umbrella repairers, 
gunsmiths, scissor-grinders, and watchmakers, too, still hang out appro- 
priate symbols of their callings, and Boston is one of the few remaining 
cities where old-time artizans and tradesmen still proclaim their crafts with 
representative street signs' 

Lucius Beebe 




The new Post OflBce and Federal Building ( Cram and Ferguson ) covers 
an entire block between Devonshire, Congress, Water, and Milk Streets. 

12 




The Old State House still stands in the heart of Boston's financial dis- 
trict, in the middle of State Street. 



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'From the Head of the Pier you go up the chief Street of the Town, at 
the upper End of which is the Town House or Exchange [Old State House 
today]; a fine Piece of Building, containing besides the Walk for the Mer- 
chants, the Council Chamber, or the House of Commons, and another 
spacious Room for the Sessions of the Courts of Justice, the Exchange is 
surrounded with Booksellers Shops, which have a good trade' 

Daniel Neal 1720 




Dock Square and Faneuil Hall, 'The Cradle of Liberty' 



'The proverbial use of the cradle has ever been to rock the baby to 
sleep; and Heaven knows our old fathers made no such use of Faneuil Hall; 
in their early management of the bantling; for it was an ever-wakeful child 
from the very moment of its first, sharp, shrill, life cry' 

Lucius Manlius Sargent 

Once Dock Square deserved its name, for here, before Long Wharf was 
built and the square was filled, was the townspeople's principal landing 
place. Now it seems a long way from the sea, but from the seventeenth 
century to the present, it has always been the greatest market area, and it is 
as lively and picturesque today, with its great heaps and barrels of good 
food, its ruddy, voluble marketmen and its intense Yankee buyers, as it 
ever was. And hereabouts are a number of famous restaurants. The Union 
Oyster House is two hundred years old, and its bar was beloved by Daniel 

17 



Webster. There are many others; among the most famous is Durgin and 
Park. As Lucius Beebe says, 'You do not dine in the gourmet's sense there, 
but you feed magnificently,' 

Peter Faneuil ( one of the many poor emigrant boys of non-English blood 
who have proved in Boston Horatio Alger is not always wrong) gave the 
original hall to his city to be used as a market below and a meeting place 
for citizens above. Smibert designed the building in 1742, and Charles 
Bulfinch skillfully enlarged it to its present size. From the public meetings 
held on that second floor, it has earned the name 'Cradle of Liberty.' Some 
of the angriest meetings that ever rocked this cradle came during the 
Abolitionist days. And by the terms of its charter it is still available, rent 
free, to groups of citizens. Faneuil Hall was always a popular place in 
which to feast great visitors: D'Estaing and Lafayette, Andrew Jackson, 
Van Buren, Commodore Hull, and many others. It has a fine collection of 
portraits and pictures on its walls. On the third floor is the museum of The 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company — America's oldest military 
organization, going back to 1637. 

Its weathervane, a glass-eyed copper grasshopper, has been hopping 
about trying to keep up with the fluctuations in Boston weather for over 

two hundred years. In the 
sailing-vessel era American 
consuls would say to seamen 
claiming Boston residence, 
'What's on top of Faneuil 
Hall?' If they did not say, *a 
grasshopper,' they were not 
Bostonians. 




18 







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'There are festoons of sausages, pyramids of Northern Spies, whole 
mounds of rabbits . . . sirloins of prime heavy beef, shoals of halibut, 
sturgeon and Delaware shad, parterres of Indian Runner ducks, regiments 
of crated eggs. There are cheeses from Melton Mowbray, Montreal melons, 
pompano from Florida waters, firkins of good New England creamery 
butter, alligator pears, and smoked salmon, and braces of grouse, a fragrant 
and eye-filling farrago of table fare, a gustatory epic* 

Lucius Beebe 

Back of Faneuil Hall is Quincy Market, built in 1826 by Josiah Quincy, 
one of Boston's first and greatest mayors. At dawn every day this enert^etic 
mayor mounted his horse and rode all over a much smaller Boston, remedy- 
ing evils and thinking up new enterprises. He introduced city water and 

19 




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sewage systems and cut the death rate by a third. For the first time m her 
history the streets of Boston were cleaned. Quincy Market is his greatest 
monument and has been a steady source of income to the city ever since it 
was built. 

20 




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Sam Adams, 'a statesman incorruptible and fearless' 

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'Like a four-sided wedge 
The Custom House Tower 
Pokes at the low, flat sky, 



The cross-hatchings of rain cut the Tower obliquely. 
Mutilating its perpendicular grey surface 
With the sharp precisions of tools' 

Amy Lowell 



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As soon as Blackstone Street is crossed, one is in North Boston. For a 
long time this part of Boston was cut off from the rest of town by a ship 
canal. It was the most elegant section of town, as well as the heart of the 
shipbuilding trade. Caulkers and sail-makers, ship carpenters and fore- 
mast-hands, lived in small back alleys close to the great houses and gardens 
of the rich. In bad times there were often riots, for the North Enders' 
were known as a turbulent, independent folk, very interested in politics. 
The word 'Caucus' is said to come fiom the meetings of these North End 
caulkers. In everything Boston ever did that upset the Tories, 'North 
Enders' played their part. 

The heart of this section is North Square, and one of the leaders of the 
artisans of the Revolutionary Period was Paul Revere. His frowning little 
house still stands. It was about a hundred years old when he bought it in 
1770 and is the only seventeenth-century house still standing in a large 

25 



American city. Inside it is attractively and appropriately furnished with 
articles of Paul Revere s period, and prints, and some things of his own. 
It was from this house (by a back door because the square was full of 
British soldiers ) Revere started out for the most famous of his many rides 
on the 18th of April in 75.' Major Pitcaim of the British Marines was 
quartered almost next door to Revere. It was he who the next morning 
out in Lexington said, 'Disperse, Ye Rebels. Ye villains, disperse. Lay 
down your arms. Why don't ye lay dovsai your arms?' And the first shot of 
the Revolution was fired. 

Near-by, on Garden Court, Sir Harry Frankland and his beautiful Agnes 
Surriage lived. How he met her, why he did not marry her, how she saved 
his life and he did marry her, is New England's most famous romance. Next 
to his house was Governor Thomas Hutchinson's. It was this house the 
mob sacked in 1765. Roundabout North Square lived, preached, and wrote 
the Mathers — and here once stood ( at the northern end of the square) 
'the Church of the Mathers.' 

Early in the last century this square and North Boston had gone down- 
hill, and was largely inhabited by emigrants — first Irish, then Jewish, and 
Italian. Little money was spent in improvements, with the result that many 

of the crooked little streets 
still carry their old-fashioned 
names (Sun Court and Moon 
Streets, Salutation and Char- 
ter) and follow their ancient 
courses. Surrounded by the 
sea on three sides, there is still 
a sparkle and freshness to the 
air. Life in North Boston is 
no longer elegant, but it seems 
cheerful, although from the 
tourist's point of view a little 
too intent on pointing out the 
landmarks for a dime. 




26 



boat tied up as a permanent home for a family who have taken this method 
of solving the housing shortage, or are especially fond of the smell of 
harbor water and fish. 

The little fishermen' often sell their fish to peddlers, whose two-wheeled 
carts make an intricate jack-straw pattern along the wharf. 

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Once the largest ships in the world tied up along these wharves. 

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Across the harbor in South Boston is the Fish Pier. Here is every modern 
facility — and also the age-old dangers of storm and the age-old virtues 
of fortitude and courage. Such ice as is shown in these pictures is rare, but 
weather is variable in Boston and always a fit and favorite subject for con- 
versation. Scientists believe that this bright and fluctuating New England 
weather is one reason why the local type ( regardles of racial strain ) tends 
toward quick thinking, independence, and ingenuity. Although some- 
times summer days may seem soft and warm as Florida, there is here no 
tropical languor. Yankees have always had to think fast to keep up with 
their weather. But this climate is (according to the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company) one of the healthiest in the world. And it is one 
reason children from all over the country are so often sent here for school. 
For all-the-y ear-round outdoor recreation, this northeast corner of America 
has no rival. 



38 



India Wharf is also worth the traveler's time. It was built at the peak 
of the India trade, and when completed, in 1807, it was the finest water- 
front development in America. Charles Bulfinch was the architect. Now 
only his brick central building remains. It runs up to the amazing height 
(considering there were no elevators ) of seven stories — a massive, solid 
structure. Sad it seems to us now with even its view of the sea blocked 
by modern buildings. There it stands waiting for the great ships that will 
not return, for it has seen many ships from those first rash little venturers 
into the Pacific to the clippers jammed with cheering hundreds 'off for 
California with my banjo on my knee.' From this wharf late in November, 
1898, Boston's most famous ghost ship sailed into the unknown and the 
worst of all New England storms. The snow fell softly as the Portland 
backed out of her slip. By midnight such a fury of snow, sleet, wind, such 
mountainous waves, had never been ever dreamed of. A hundred and 
forty-one ships were wrecked on the New England coast that night. The 
Portland just disappeared. There was not one survivor of the one hundred 
and seventy-six people who left India Wharf that night. 





'Here cargoes from all parts of the world were bought and sold and 
accounted for, without the aid of steam heat, clacking typewriter, and office 
system. An odor of tar and hemp, mingled with spicy suggestions from 
the merchandise stored above, pervaded everything. Respectable men 
clerks (female clerks, sir? — would you have female sailors?) on high stools 
were constantly writing in the calf-bound letter-books, ledgers, and waste- 
books, or delving in the neat wooden chests that enclosed the records of 
each particular vessel. Owners, some crabbed and crusty, others with the 
manners of a merchant prince, received you before blazing open fires of 
hickory or cannel coal, in rooms adorned with portraits and half-models 
of vessels. Through the small-paned windows one could see the firm's new 
ship being rigged under the owner's eye.' 

Samuel Eliot Morison 



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Park Street land opposite the Common and long had used it for a public 
'granary,' an almshouse, and a bridewell. It was sold oflF with the restric- 
tion 'that all buildings — shall be regular and uniform with other buildings. 
The Amory-Ticknor House at the top of the street (Lafayette slept 
here), and numbers four, six, seven, eight — all date from this early 'city 
planning.* Bulfinch was the architect of most of these houses. 

49 



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T/je fota/ elision of the R, and the amazing, broad, flat A, as in "Pahk 
Street," give to Bostonian speech a magnificently indigenous tang; hint at 
juniper and spruce forests, rocky fields, pumpkins. Thanksgiving, and pie' 

Harrison Rhodes 




The Common seen through St. Paul's Greek Revival columns 

51 




Among the first things the settlers of Boston did was to set aside certain 
lands tor common pasturage and a common training ground. And it was 
to be — forever — a place for all to take their pleasure. Generations of 
children have played here, from the Puritan child with kite, marbles, 
hoops, and sleds to the present urchin shrieking in the Frog Pond. Nor 
have the pleasures of adolescence been neglected. In 1675 it was *a 
pleasant Common, where the Gallants, a little before Sunset, walk vdth 
their Marmalet-Madams.' Whatever a 'marmalet-madam' may be, it is still 
popular with sailors and their girls. On the Common were the greatest of 
colonial military parades and musters, and from here the colonial troops 
followed Amherst to Quebec and the British troops marched to Lexington, 
Concord, and Bunker Hill. The recruiting and encampments of the Civil 

52 



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War were here. From the Common marched the men who went South 
to fight for those rights of man of which these open acres are a symbol. 
Among them was Colonel Shaw's Fifty-Fourth Colored Regiment. To the 
honor of the voung colonel and his colored troops Saint-Gaudens's memo- 
rial has been placed on the Common at Beacon Street. 

In less than two months Colonel Shaw and half his regiment were killed 
as the Fiftv-Fourth led the attack on Fort Wagner. He was buried in the 
trench with his men. The English elms shading this memorial are the 
oldest trees left on the Common. They were planted by John Hancock. A 
little way down Beacon Street still stands one more of his elms. These 
trees withstood the 'Great Blow' of 1805 and the Hurricane of 1938. 

During our two last great wars the Common has blossomed with endless 
temporary servicemen's clubs, booths for selling Liberty or Victory bonds, 
and war gardens. 

But in spite of the pleasure it has given children, courting couples, 
pigeons and squirrels, and aged sitters upon its hard benches, and in spite 
of its uses in wartime, the oldest and most everyday business of the Com- 
mon was the pasturing of animals. To drive cows to the Common in the 
morning and home again for milking in the evening was the children's 
work. Among these little cow-herders was Ralph Waldo Emerson. Not 
until 1830 was the last cow banished. To this day it is said there exists a 
small right of way running from Mount Vernon Street across Chestnut and 
Beacon Streets to the Common for the benefit of those cows who come no 
more. On Beacon you may see the stately bronze gateway through which 
(theoretically) a cow may pass. 

In the Victorian era efforts were made to give the Common a more 
elegant name and to rechristen the Frog Pond 'Quincy Lake.' All such 
ignoble efforts have failed. 

The Common has always had to fight against commercial encroachments. 
The first generation produced certain small-minded citizens who wanted 
to use it for a town dump and threw stones, trash, and 'dead dogs and cats, 
or other stinkeing things,' thus, in the words of the old ordinance, 'annoy- 
ing the Common.' Ever since, the fight has been going on between those 
who wish to keep it for the common pleasure of all and those who would 
'annoy' it. 




The Shaw Memorial . . . 



*Can you see those brave men well-drilled and disciplined, proud of 
themselves, proud of their handsome colonel (he was only twenty-six years 
old) and of their gallant earnest young white officers marching through 
crowded streets in order to salute Governor Andrew, their true friend, 
standing before the State House — while thousands of men and women 
cheered them — the despised race — to the echo as they went forth to blot 
out with their own blood the sin of the nationF 

Thomas Wentworth Higginson 



'The boys who have coasted on the lon^ malls of Boston Common, played 
upon its hall-grounds, and received inspiration from orations of great states- 
men and from the frequent military parades there, have afterwards stormed 
many heights in the military service of their country. Many a hero of our 
Navy has sailed his first boat in the "Frog Pond.** ' 

Edward A. Parker 1899 



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'Boston State House is the huh of the solar system. You couldnt pry 
that out of a Boston man if you had the tire of all creation straightened 
for a crowbar.' 

Oliver Wendell Holmes 



By 1795, Boston had badly outgrown her little old State House down on 
State Street. Charles Bulfinch was asked to go ahead with his designs for 
a new one. The young architect (he was twenty-four when he first began 
planning this building) went ahead boldly, evolving an architectural type 
which nobly expressed the aspirations of his young country. His dome, 
normally gilded, is the most famous of Boston landmarks. The main build- 
ing is his, and he should not be blamed for the huge inept wings. They are 
much later. Much of the interior is little changed, especially the Old Hall 

57 




The gilded dome 'high in the air; poised in the right place over every- 
thing that clustered below; the most felicitous object in Boston.' 

Henry James 



of Representatives (where the 'sacred codfish' hangs) and the Old Senate 
Chamber. Bulfinch served his little tovni (it had forty thousand inhabi- 
tants), not only as an architect, but for twenty-tw^o years as a selectman. 
His knowledge of the actual needs of the city combined with his artistic 
genius made him one of the most valuable citizens Boston has ever had. 
Whether it was new streets, houses for the rich, almshouses for the poor, 
theaters, hospitals, or wharves, Bulfinch, in his dual capacity, knew what 
to do. 

58 



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The water in the distance is Boston Harbor, bisected by the white finger 
of the Custom House Tower. The large building to the left is the Court 
House (see opposite page). Beacon Street cuts the picture from top to 
bottom. Little Park Street with its church is one boundary of the Common. 
Charles Street (below the spider of crossing paths) is where it ends. Here, 
on Charles Street Mall, anyone with a soap box and a mission can hold forth 
on Sunday afternoons. Next below is the Public Garden with part of the 
Back Bay in the lower right hand corner, and 'The Shell,' a piece of the 
Esplanade, and the Charles River on your left. Back of the Esplanade 
rises Beacon Hill. 



63 



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Beacon Street 




'The sunny street which holds the sifted few' 

Oliver Wendell Holmes 

The State House is handsomely situated on the highest hill in Boston — 
Beacon Hill. Once this section was mostly pasturage and orchard with a 
scattering of handsome estates. John Hancock's elegant house was on the 
corner of Beacon and Joy Streets. The hill then was much higher, reach- 
ing almost to the top of the present State House dome. During Bulfinch's 
period the hill was cut down, and the present streets laid out. Most of 

64 



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these houses were built 
within forty years. Much 
of the charm of Beacon 
Hill today is an architec- 
tural unity rare in Amer- 
ica. Bulfinch himself de- 
signed many of these 
houses. Lesser architects 
worked in a similar man- 
ner. So one sees over and 
over the same pattern of 
rosy brick, shallow bow 
windows, simple, fastidi- 
ous doorways. It is a 
graceful, pre-eminently 
sensible type of dwelling 
restrained and complete- 
ly without any great 
flourishes. On Beacon 
Street, the Somerset 
Club (the old Sears Man- 
sion), Number 41-42, is 
one of the most pre- 
tentious — 'The Somerset, that reservoir of Boston Blue Blood.' The 
Women's City Club, Number 40, has one of the most beautiful of the 
tv'pical curving stairways of the period. It is probably Bulfinch — Number 
45 certainly is. 

Up from Beacon runs Walnut Street. It was from his home. Number 8, 
late in November, 1849, that Doctor Parkman left for his fatal rendezvous 
with Doctor Webster. The result of this meeting was what Edmund Pear- 
son calls 'America's classic murder' and the only known time one Harvard 
faculty man has killed another one. . 



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On Charles Street and in that vicinity are antique shops, inexpensive 
restaurants, shop windows full of books or flowers, gifts or silver. 



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Parallel to Beacon is Chestnut. At Number 13 lived Julia Ward Howe 
and later John Singer Sargent. Francis Parkman's house was Number 50. 
Number 29A Chestnut Street, where Edwin Booth once lived, is one of the 
most attractive of Beacon Hill houses. This is also by Bulfinch. Here, as 
elsewhere, in this section, one notices the lavender panes of glass. This 
color was not intentional. It changed from white to lavender. Why, no one 
seems to know. But lavender glass in a Boston home stands for the same 
thing as blue blood in Boston veins. 

Next over from Chestnut Street is Mount Vernon. Henry James said it 
was 'the only respectable street in America,' and respectable it still is. But 
in Puritan days it seems to have had a diflFerent reputation. Then the 
slight hill which gave Mount Vernon its name was called Mount Whoredom. 

67 




Loiiisburg Square (pronounced Lewisberg) is an epitome of the whole 
section — the bricks so ruddy, the streets still cobbled, the brass so polished, 
cats so fat, the paint so fresh, and ladies so ladylike. Here little dogs 
wear little blankets in winter. And here Christmas Eve is celebrated with 
such joyous profusion of candles and carols that even the most skeptical 
can believe in Christmas cards. 

The central green belongs to the proprietors. Of these there are twenty- 
two. Every year when the trees are pruned the wood is divided into 

68 




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fV, 







twenty-two bundles and each proprietor gets one. It is said there is no 
gate in the iron fence which protects the green. The tiny statues repre- 
sented Aristides and Cohimbus. In her affluent days, Louisa May Alcott 
lived at Number 11. Jenny Lind was married at Number 20. William Dean 
Howells wrote his novels at Number 4. 

Visiting Englishmen have often expressed delight in this section of Bos- 
ton. It is so much like parts of pre-Blitz London. Thackeray 'always con- 
sidered Boston my native place,' and this has been the attitude of many 
Englishmen. Not all, however. Arnold Bennet thought 'the best thing 
about Boston is the five o'clock train for New York.' But the first of all 
English visitors liked this section. 

When the Puritans arrived on the peninsula which later became Boston, 
it already had one mysterious white resident, 'The Cambridge Scholar 
Blaxton — who had built his thatched cottage, with a garden and spring, 
on the site of Louisburg Square — he had brought his library with him. 
There had been books on Beacon Hill, when the wolves still howled on 
the summit,' as Van Wyck Brooks says. Blaxton (an Episcopalian) soon 
moved out. He had left England to be rid of 'my lords the Bishops' and 
now left Boston, he said, to be rid of 'my Lords the Brethren. 





'.tfc''l"*'"U . 



Pinckney Street . . . 

' with a push, one would go hurtling down the brick-paved sidewalk 

and never stop, but shoot into the Charles which was visible, far below, as 
a wedge of chilly blue, crossed now and then by a white sail' 

Jean Stafford 

Pinckney Street (just beyond Mount Vernon) is on the edge of all this 
respectability. Many of these houses have been made over for apartments, 
or are used for boarding houses. From now on, as one goes north, neither 
the architecture nor the way of life is so aristocratic. This, 'the back of the 
hill,' mixes a slightly Greenwich Village life (a life which bloomed in the 
nineteen-twenties and now is somewhat faded ) and that of the more recent 
comers to Boston than the Brahmins. In some spots it sinks toward the 
slummy. 

71 




^Harrison Gray Otis, at the age of eighty, after forty years of gout, break- 
fasted every morning on pate de foi gras. Every afternoon, at the Otis 
House, ten gallons of punch evaporated out of the Lowestoft punch-howV 

Van Wyck Brooks 



Across Cambridge Street are two memorable old landmarks. The Har- 
rison Gray Otis House ( 1795), an impressive example of how well the 
eighteenth-century gentlemen lived. It is now the headquarters for 'The 
Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities.' It is richly and 
appropriately furaished. 

72 



Close to it is the Old West Church ( 1806) by Asher Benjamin. Benjamin 
had little of Bulfinch lightness and grace, but the massive simplicity of his 
work is attractive. 



73 




Going up Mt. Vernon Street is the Church of the Advent, and just beyond 
it the Charles Street Meeting House, by Asher Benjamin. He wrote: The 
most exquisite ornaments lose all their value if they load, alter, or confuse 
the form they are designed to enrich/ This beautiful church shows how 
well he lived up to his own credo. It was built for the Baptists in 1807. In 
those days the Charles River came up to the side of the church ( hence the 
name 'River Street'). The site was chosen so the believers could be con- 
veniently immersed in the Charles. In 1876 the building was sold to the 
African Methodist Episcopal Society. Founded in 1780, this is the oldest 
colored church in New England. Now the building is no longer used as a 
church. The little shops on the ground floor pay the taxes and the hall 
above is used for neighborhood activities. 

74 



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Along the Charles River runs the 'Esplanade,' a grassy parkway, stretch- 
ing for two miles. It is lovely in summer with the sea breeze whipping in oflF 
the sea, the little sailing boats, racing shells, children playing, gulls scream- 
ing. And it is lovely in winter with black ice, skaters, and a frosting of white 

76 







The Public Garden was laid out about a hundred years ago. At that time 
the water still came up over the present Arlington Street. Planted with 
rare trees, gay with flowers and swan boats in summer, skaters in winter, 
and statues and people at all seasons, it is much loved by Bostonians. Near 
the comer of Beacon and Arlington is its queerest statue — The 'Ether 
Memorial.' It represents the good Samaritan doing good — not Doctor 
Morton administering ether. The tremendous ginkgo tree beside the statue 
is the largest in this country. Even Orientals make special visits to see it. 
In the spring it is worth any one's time to go to the comer of the garden 
at Arlington and Boylston to see the English hawthorns, set out not long 
after the retrievement of this garden from the tidal mud flats. 

In the center of the Garden is a suspension bridge, said to be the smallest 
in the world and a microscopic copy of Brooklyn Bridge in New York. It, 
like the swan boats and the geometric flower gardens and even some of the 
statues, has something of the quality of a bright, old fashioned toy. 

82 



The Public Garden has twenty-four acres and the adjoining Common 
fortv-eight more. This is a large stretch of green to find in a big city. Not 
only is it a haven for the human race but for birds. Some live there all the 
year round, but during the migrations ornithologists often count as many 
as twenty varieties in one morning's walk. Here is a great concentration of 
finches, sparrows, thrushes, warblers. Some of them, like the hermit thrush 
and Wilson's thrush, ruby-crowned kinglet, yellow-breasted chat, are more 
commonly seen here than in the countryside, where the same number of 
migrants are spread over many square miles. The distant glow of the city 
attracts them during the night, but when they arrive they have only these 
few green acres in which to rest. Some find refuge in the near-by Granary 
and the Esplanade. But the Public Garden, quiet and bushy, is their de- 
light. They are not molested and seem much tamer than in the country, 
but to see them you must rise early. Although they will often rest for 
several days, they are somewhat sobered by the city noises and rarely sing, 
only chirp and chat a little. 











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It hardly seems like spring in Boston until the flowers begin in the Public 
Garden. Daffodils, hyacinths, tulips. And the neatly bedded pansies. 
There is nothing naturalistic about the arrangement of the flowers — but 
no true Bostonian would wish them otherwise. All through the flowering 
season as soon as one species has stopped the next begins — bulbs first, then 
fuchsias, geraniums, heliotrope, and in midsummer exotic tropical plants 
which for a few months make this corner of Boston look almost like Havana. 



84 






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87 



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The loiterer in Boston probably has already seen 'the late George Apley' 
stepping cautiously out of the Somerset Club on Beacon Street, crossing 
the Common on his way to State Street or entering a Louisburg Square 
home to visit his aunts. For John Marquand did create a synthesis of 
aridities, frustrations, vague decencies which any Bostonian can recognize 
as 'a t\'pe.' It was in the Arlington Street Church George Apley married 
Catherine Bosworth with the words 'This is the end' upon his lips. 

89 







Thomas Ball's statue of Washington faces down Commonwealth Avenue. 
It has been complained that the sculptor forgot to give the horse a tongue. 
Boston has always had a passionate belief in kindness to dumb animals. 
One of the earliest laws the Puritans added to English common law forbade 
'any Tirranny or Crueltie towards any bruite creatures/ and Bostonians 
disliked the idea of a mistreated horse — even in bronze. 



90 








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The Back Bay,' as the residential district running west from the Pubhc 
Garden is called, was filled in just as ladies were discarding hoopskirts, and 
canned food was becoming popular. So it is said to rest on these two com- 
modities. By this time, the architects were more anxious to show their 
virtuosity than during the earlier building-up of Beacon Hill, and the 
wealthy people more anxious to show their wealth. The houses along New- 
bury Street, Commonwealth Avenue, Marlborough and the extension of 
Beacon Street are massively Victorian. And to us seem heavily conservative. 
This new building venture, however, did not seem conservative to the gen- 
eration who built it or lived here. The quick filling was an engineering 
triumph. Those who chose to live here were thought to be risking their 
lives, for built on tidal mud flats, it was feared malaria would kill them all. 
But among the first to move was Doctor Oliver Wendell Holmes. Com- 
menting upon his old overcrowded house on the Hill he committed what 
he called 'justifiable domicide.' His son, the future great Justice Holmes, 
lived here with him at 296. An even younger boy who took up his residence 
here at this time was Santayana, the half-Spanish, half-Boston philosopher. 
Both boys loved the sunsets across the Charles. 'Gorgeous these sunsets 
often were,' Santavana remarked. 'More gorgeous, most Bostonians be- 
lieved, than any sunset anywhere else in the world.' And an address to this 
day on the water side of Beacon is considered very good. 

And here, if anywhere, is the appropriate moment to quote those ancient 

lines: 

/ 
'And this is good old Boston, 

The home of the bean and the cod; 

Where the Lowells speak only to Cabots 

And the Cabots speak only to God.' 

Little by little doctors' offices and choice shops are invading the Back 
Bay. The most sensational newcomer is Radio Boston WRUL, one of the 
most powerful of short-wave stations in existence and able to reach any 
spot in the world. It did noble service during the second World War, 
bringing hope of liberation to millions of conquered people who risked 
their lives to listen, and keeping in touch with underground groups. 



TJR'^* 






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The Boston Public Library bounds the west end of Copley Square, which 
is formed by the coming-together of Huntington Avenue and Boylston 
Street. About this square are a number of hotels and several buildings of 
architectural fame. Next to the handsome library is the picturesque 'new' 
Old South ( lineal descendant of the Old South on Washington Street), and 
at Copley is the beautiful Trinity Church. 

There have always been books in Boston, and printing and publishing. 
From the beginning there have been private libraries. Both the Athenaeum 
and the Massachusetts Historical Society are examples of fine, venerable, 
generous, privately-supported libraries. But a genuinely free public hbrary, 
supported by everyone and serving everyone is a rather new idea. In 1825, 
Josiah Quincy, greatest of Boston mayors, was waiting at the city hue, sur- 
rounded by guardsmen and citizenry, to welcome Lafayette. The mayor 
ordered free punch to be served, but thought to himself: 'Had anyone 

94 



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'In Boston they ask. 
How much does he 
know? In New York, 
How much is he 
worth? In Philadel- 
phia, Who were his 
parentsF 

Mark Twain 



proposed to provide free books at the expense of the tax-payer, there 
would have been much indignation. We should have been aghast at the 
impudence of such a proposal; but a few glasses of punch was another 
matter.' 

It took twenty-five years, much agitation, and many gifts before this idea 
of free books became a fact. Help in the practical shape of $100,000 came 
from a wealthy London banker, Joshua Bates. He had been bom over here 
and had lived in Boston. 'My own experiences as a poor boy convinced 
me of the great advantage of such a library,' he said. He remembered how 
he had had no money to buy books. A kind bookseller had let him read 
nights in his shop. To this day Bates Hall recalls his gift. Not only was 
money given, by many eminent men, but also great private libraries like 
that of the Reverend Thomas Prince, built up before the Revolution and 
containing some of the rarest of Americana. Nathaniel Bowditch's library, 
and those of John Adams and George Ticknor are now here. So is 



96 




Lewissohn's Washingtoniana, Sabbatier's books on Saint Francis d'Assisi, a 
fine collection of Franklin's books and engravings, and priceless incunabula. 
These are samples of its treasures. It is one of the great libraries of the 
world. 

In 1895 the present building (McKim, Mead, and White) was completed. 
It is a direct and impressive building on the outside and lavishly beautiful 
inside. The yellow marble and stone lions of the stairway, French's bronze 
doors, the central court (where smoking is allowed), murals by Puvis de 
Chavannes, by Abbey ( 'The Holy Grail*), and by Sargent all add their glory 
to the building and to Boston. 

Although so eminently distinguished an institution, the Public Library 
has added a little humor to Boston legends. It is said for years New Yorkers 
wanted to go to Bates Hall to see if it were true there was a sign there 
saying 'Only low conversation allowed here.' When there was great agita- 
tion over the subway exits on the Common, Boston was divided into warring 
factions. 

'Now that they are built, how do you think they look?' said one of the 
victors to a vanquished citizen. 

'To me, sir, they look as if the Public Library had pupped on the Com- 
mon.' 

And so they do . . . 

97 







Trinity Church is romantic, colorful, picturesque (Richardson, 1877). 
Before it, facing Copley Square is Saint Gaudens's statue of Phillips Brooks. 
Although much admired for its artistry, it has been criticized by those who 
knew the great preacher. Brooks was six feet four, but the sculptor with 
a commendable desire to make Christ more impressive than his servant, 
was unable to suggest this fact. Every year at Christmas time, all over 
Beacon Hill, all over Boston and the Christian world, Phillips Brooks's *Oh, 
Little Town of Bethlehem' is still sung and loved — a greater monument to 
this good man than even the finest of bronze statues. 




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Square. For some reason it does not seem to detract from nor belittle its 
older neighbors in spite of the great difference in architectural style. 



101 




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The Christian Science Church in Boston is 'The Mother Church' for all 
Christian Scientists. Joined to the large domed modem building is the 
original church with its memories and mementoes of Mary Baker Eddy. 
Across the street is the Publishing House where the famous newspaper is 
printed. And beyond its entrance hall, the Maparium. The walls of this 
spherical room are of colored glass, depicting the continents and oceans 
of the world. 



103 





■*! 



Dr. Serge Koussevitsky, for twenty-two years conductor of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra , . . 

104 



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The Boston Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1881 and nineteen 
years later Symphony Hall was built to house it. It is one of the finest, 
or the finest, of American symphony orchestras. After the winter season is 
over comes ten weeks of 'The Pops' when the dignified concert hall is filled 
with tables, food is served, and a semi-popular program is played by a 
reduced orchestra. 

This section is the musical heart of Boston. Near-by is the New England 
Conservatory, one of the oldest institutions of its kind in the country, and 
one of the best. Over a hundred and forty thousand students have studied 
here, many of them now world famous, and there are also many private 
teachers roundabout. There are numerous musical societies for chamber 
music and small concerts. Generations of ambitious young music students 
have eaten at these restaurants (after programs) and roomed in the 
many side streets. This is Boston's Latin Quarter, and many have in- 
formally graduated from what has been called 'The University of Hunting- 
ton Avenue.' Foreign musicians have long loved Boston, and many make 
their homes here. 



105 




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Farther out in the Fens 
is The Isabella Stewart 
Gardner Museum, Fenway 
Court. 'Mrs, Jack' was a re- 
markable lady, not only as 
an art patron and collector, 
but as an individual. Hers 
was the sort of personality 
that attracts friends and 
admirers, and her fabulous 
charm was a subject of con- 
versation in many a draw- 
ing room — not only in Bos- 
ton but in the many cities 
she visited all over the 
world. This portrait of her 
by Sargent was completed 
only after the ninth try. 
After eight failures, the art- 
ist asked Mrs. Gardner 
whether she was — as some 
of his friends had suggested 

— like the other rich women 
who delighted in sitting for him but who were never satisfied with the 
results. She denied this, went on to say that she had been reading Dante 
and that, since Dante's mystic number was nine, she was sure the next 
attempt would be successful. And so it was. The portrait, incidentally, 
was considered highly immodest when first hung. Not only were the neck 
and arms exposed, but the subject was wearing pearls around her waist, 
and in Boston that was thought vulgar. 

The art collection started with a few fine works which Mrs. Gardner 
bought on her European travels to decorate her Beacon Street home. But 
her purchases soon outgrew her Boston house, and in 1899 Fenway Court 

— modelled after a Venetian palace — was started. She filled the palace 
with treasures — mosaic floors from Roman villas, columns from ancient 
temples, sculpture from Italian churches. Medieval stained glass and 
carving, paintings by great masters. When Mrs. Gardner died, she left a 
fund to maintain the palace as a museum. In the central courtyard, flower 
displays are magnificently arranged, and in the music room, small concerts 
are presented during museum hours. 

113 




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The Massachusetts Historical Society also faces the Fens. Founded in 
1791, it is the oldest historical society in the United States. Primarily it is 
a library, and is one of the greatest reservoirs of American manuscripts, 
rare books, prints, and newspapers. It has also a small museum. 

Over fifty denominations are listed in Boston with Roman Catholics the 
largest group. The picture opposite was taken in one of Boston's loveliest 
Catholic churches, St. Clement's Church on Boylston Street near the Fen- 
way. Formerly a Universalist Church, it was purchased by the late Car- 
dinal O'Connell and is now a center for the Perpetual Adoration of the 
Blessed Sacrament by the Catholic religious and lay people. The shrine is 
in the charge of the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, who take turns kneel- 
ing in adoration before the Blessed Sacrament. Thousands of Boston's men 
and women participate in Nocturnal Adoration at specific hours. 

114 






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The trickle of water, which might be called the spinal cord of the long 
and serpentine Tens,' moves sluggishly under bridges and through pleasant 
natural fields. People come here to walk, ride horseback, to sun them- 
selves, think ( Bostonians like to think), sketch a little, watch birds, or pho- 
tograph. Here on any decent day the loiterer can see the western sky fill 
with sunset glory and (if he is of that temperament) dream a little of 
Boston's past. But better yet, rise early and see the sun rising — prophetic 
of what Boston may become. For no city can reach farther than the aspira- 
tions, understanding, reverence of her people — and among her own people 
Boston includes all who have come to love her. 



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'Let every child that is born of her, and every child of her adoption see 
to it to keep the name of Boston as clean as the Sun; and in distant ages 
her motto shall he the prayer of millions on all the hills that gird the town. 
"As with our Fathers, so God he with us." ' 

R. W. Emerson 



For Photographers Only 



I had fun and exercise getting these photographs of Boston, and I also 
had to do quite a bit of advance planning to picture the subjects in the best 
and most dynamic way. Most buildings are not very photogenic or inter- 
esting unless you can get unusual lighting, frame the picture effectively, or 
get personalities in the scene. Telephoto and wide angle lenses, different 
filters, flash combined with sunlight can transform a mediocre subject into 
an exciting one. I didn't resort to any trick photography. All the photo- 
graphs were enlarged directly from the negatives without any retouching. 
The cameras used for all the black and white photographs were a Super 
Ikonta B and a Contax with four interchangeable lenses; a 3.5 cm wide 
angle, 50 cm, 8.5 cm telephoto, and 18 cm telephoto. A great many of the 
shots would have been impossible without the different focal-length lenses. 
The pictures on pages 4, 95, 98, and 111 had to be made at a certain time 
of day. For example, the ray of sun strikes the lion's head (on page 95) for 
only a few minutes on a sunny afternoon, and the front of King's Chapel 
catches the sun for a very brief time. The sun never hits the Shaw 
Memorial, so I used a flash on the camera and an extension to supplement 
the sunhght. Side lighting and backlighting often spell the difference be- 
tween a mediocre picture and a good one — the old idea of always having 
the sun over your shoulder has been superseded. The steam coming out of 
the coffee pot on page 11 needed backlighting as did the water in the 
picture on page 81. 

People, especially children, add interest to views. The kids on page 42 
made this picture — for a quarter — and the chap on the opposite page had 
no thought of feeding his horse until I gave him the idea. I experimented 
with several angles before getting the pictures on pages 56, 99, and 100 
effectively framed. You can't get the best angles and views by always stay- 
ing on the ground. I took some of the pictures from a plane — using an 
18 cm telephoto lens, since government restrictions prohibit low flying over 
the city. To get the grasshopper on top of the cupola of Faneuil Hall, I 
had to climb countless stairs and ladders, open a skylight, and trust a mus- 
cular janitor to hold my legs while I leaned out and shot skyward. 

118 



All the color photographs were made on Daylight Kodachrome film in 
a 4 X 5 Speed Graphic with a 6-inch lens. ( I used the 4x5 film because 
of the difficulty engravers have making plates from 35mm film.) The 
camera was mounted on a tripod, and the average exposure was 1/25 of a 
second at f II. 

Many of these photographs were made on assignment for the Boston 
Globe Rotogravure Section. We are extremely grateful to the Globe for 
allowing us to reproduce them in this book. 

I have listed below the factual information about each picture. 



PAGE 


CAMEBA 


Title page 


Ikonta 


Facing page 1 


Contax 


Page 1 


Gintax 


3 


Contax 


4 


Contax 


5 


Ikonta 


6 


Ikonta 


7 


Ikonta 


8 


Ikonta 


9 


Contax 


10 


Ikonta 


11 


Ikonta 


12 


Ikonta 


13 


Contax 


14 


Contax 


15 


Contax 


16 


Contax 


17 


Contax 


18 


Ikonta 


19 


Ikonta 


20 


Ikonta 


21 


Ikonta 


22 


Contax 


23 


Ikonta 


24 


Contax 


25 


Ikonta 


26 


Ikonta 


27 


Ikonta 


28 


Ikonta 


29 


Ikonta 


SO 


Ikonta 


31 


Ikonta 


32 


Ikonta 


33 


Ikonta 


34 


Contax 



Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Infra red film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Mediiun pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Mediimi pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Fast pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 
Medium pan. film 



Tessar f 2.8 
50 cm. lens 
50 cm. lens 
Wide angle lens 
Wide angle lens 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Wide angle lens 
50 cm. lens 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
50 cm. lens 
50 cm. lens 
50 cm. lens 
Wide angle lens 
50 cm. lens 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
8.5 cm. telephoto 
Tessar f 2.8 
50 cm. lens 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Tessar f 2.8 
Wide angle lens 



APEai- 

TTTHE 



f 5.6 

f 5.6 
f 5.6 
f 4.5 
f 4.5 
f 4.5 
f 5.6 
f 4.5 
f 4 
f 8 
f 5.6 
f 8 
f 6.3 
f 4.5 
f 4.5 
f 5.6 
f8 
f4 
f 8 
f 5.6 
f 8 
f 5.6 
f 8 
f 5.6 
f5.6 
f 5.6 
f 16 
f 8 
f8 
f 8 
f 5.6 
f 5.6 
f 8 
f 5.6 
f 5.6 



EXPOSURE 



l/lOO sec 
1/250 sec 
1/250 sec 
l/50 sec 
1/125 sec 
1/200 sec 
1/200 sec 
1/100 sec 
l/lOO sec 
1/125 sec 
1/100 sec 
1/100 sec 
1/100 sec 
1/50 sec 
1/SO sec 
1/250 sec 
1/250 sec 
1/125 sec 
1/100 sec 
1/200 sec 
l/lOO sec 
1/100 sec 
1/125 sec 
1/100 sec 
1/250 sec 
l/lOOsec 
1/100 sec 
1/200 sec 
1 sec 
l/lOOsec 
1/100 sec 
1/200 sec 
1/200 sec 
1/200 sec 
1/250 sec 



Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 
Red filter 
Medium yeUow filter 

Medium yellow filter 



Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 



Double fiash 
Medium yellow filter 



Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 
Medium yellow filter 

Mediimi yellow filter 
Double flash 
Medium yellow filter 



Medium 
Medium 
Medium 
Medium 
Medium 
Medium 



yellow filter 
yellow filter 
yellow filter 
yellow filter 
yellow filter 
yellow filter 



119 



PAGE 


CAMERA 

Ikonta 


FILM 


LENS 


APER- 
TURE 


EXPOSURE 




PaRe 35 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 -sec 


Medium yellow filter 


36 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


l/lOO sec 




37 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


38 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


39 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


40 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


41 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 5.6 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


42 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


43 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


44 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


45 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


46 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f4 


1/500 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


47 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


18 cm. telephoto 














lens 


f 4 


1/500 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


48 


Contax 


Fast pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 8 


5 sec 




49 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


50 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


51 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 




52 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


53 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 .sec 


Medium yellow filter 


54 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Double flash 


55 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


56 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


57 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


58 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


8.5 cm. telephoto 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


59 


Ikonta 


Fast pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 11 


1/100 sec 


Double flash 


60 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


61 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


62 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


63 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 4 


1/400 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


64 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


fS 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


65 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


65 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


66 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 




67 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


68 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


69 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


70 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


71 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


72 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


73 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


74 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


8.5 cm. telephoto 


f 5.6 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


75 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


77 


Contax 


Fast pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 1.5 


1 sec 




78 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


79 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


80 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


81 


C!ontax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 4.5 


1/500 sec 




82 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


18 cm. telephoto 
lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 





120 



n 



PAGE 


CAMERA 


FILiM 


LENS 


APER- 
TURE 

f 5.6 


EXPOSURE 




Page 88 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


84 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


85 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


86 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


87 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


88 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


89 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


90 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


91 


Contax 


Infra red film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/50 sec 


Red filter 


92 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.6 


f 4.5 


1/400 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


93 


Contax 


Infra red film 


50 cm. lens 


f 6.6 


1/200 sec 


Red filter 


94 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 


Medium yeUow filter 


95 


Contax 


Fast pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 4.5 


1/50 sec 




96 


Ikonta 


Fast pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 2.8 


1/25 sec 




97 


Contax 


Fast pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 2.8 


1/25 sec 




98 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/50 sec 




99 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


100 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


101 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yello\f filter 


102 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 cm. lens 


f 5.6 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


103 


Contax 


Fast pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 8 


1 sec 


3 flood lights 


104 


Contax 


Fast pan. film 


Telephoto lens 


f 2 


1/26 sec 


stage lighting 


106 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


106 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


107 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 11 


1/200 sec 


Double flash 


108 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 16 


1/100 sec 


Double flash 


109 


Ikonta 


Mediimi pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


110 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 4.5 


1/250 sec 


Medium yellow filter 
Tripod, delay action 
release 


111 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


Wide angle lens 


f 8 


1/125 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


112 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 6.6 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


113 


Contax 


Medium pan, film 


50 cm. lens 


f 11 


1/5 sec 


2 flood lights 


114 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


115 


Contax 


Medium pan. film 


50 era. lens 


f 2 


2 sec 


church lighting 


116 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 8 


1/100 sec 


Medium yellow filter 


116 


Ikonta 


Medium pan. film 


Tessar f 2.8 


f 5.6 


1/200 sec 





121 



Index of Places Mentioned in the Book 



Arlington Street Church, 89 
Athenaeum, 6, 94 
Atlantic Avenue, 34, 43 

Back Bay, 33, 63, 93 
Beacon Hill, 2, 63, 64, 65, 70, 93 
Beacon Street, 53, 63, 64, 65, 93 
Bunker Hill Monument, 30 

Charles River, 33, 43, 63, 74, 76 

Charles Street, 63. 66 

Charles Street Meeting House, 74 

Charlestown Navy Yard, 30 

Chestnut Street, 53, 67 

Christian Science Church, 103 

Christ Church, 27, 28, 47 

Church of the Advent, 74 

City Hall, 5 

Common, 2, 47, 52, 53, 83 

Constitution, The, 30 

Constitution Wharf, 32, 34 

Coplev Square, 94 

Copps Hill Burying Groimd, 29, 30, 32 

Court House, 63 

Custom House Tower, 16, 23, 63 

Dock Square, 17 

East Boston, 30, 32 
Esplanade, 63, 76, 77, 83 

Faneuil Hall, 17, 18 

Federal Building and Post Office, 12 

Fenway, or Fens, 107, 110, 113, 114, 116 

Fish Pier, 38 

Frog Pond, 2, 52, 53 

Garden Court, 26 

Granary Burying Ground, 6, 47, 83 

Harrison Gray Otis House, 72 

India Wharf, 40, 41 

Inner Harbor, 32, 33, 34, 43 

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, 113 

King's Chapel, 4, 5 

King's Chapel Burying Ground, 5 



Lewis Wharf, 34 
Logan Airport, 30 
Long Wharf, 16, 43 
Louisburg Square, 68, 70 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 78 
Massachusetts Historical Society, 94, 114 
Mount Vernon Street, 53, 67, 74 
Museum of Fine Arts, 107, 109 

New England Conservatory of Music, 105 
New England Mutual Building, 100 
'New' Old South, 94, 99 
North Boston, 25, 26 
North Square, 25, 26 

Old Corner Book Store, 8 

Old North Church. See Christ Church. 

Old South Meeting, 9, 10, 47 

Old State House, 13-16 

Old West Church, 73 

Park Street, 48, 49, 50, 63 

Park Street Chtirch, 47, 48 

Paul Revere Mall, 27 

Paul Revere's House, 25, 26 

Pinckney Street, 71 

Public Garden, 2, 63, 82-90 

Public Library, 94-97 

Quincy Market, 19, 20 

St. Clement's Church, 114 
St. Paul's Cathedral, 51 
Salem Street, 27, 28 
Shaw Memorial, 53 
'Shell,' 63, 77 
Somerset Club, 65 
South Boston, 32, 34, 38 
State House, 2, 57-60, 64 
Symphony Hall, 105 

Temple Israel, 110 
Trinity Church, 94, 98 
T Whari^, 34 

Walnut Street, 65 
Women's City Club, 65 



122 



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Central Library, Copley Square 

Division of / 

Reference and Research Services ^ 



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Please do not remove cards from this 
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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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TOINTS 


OF INTEREST IN 


"BOSTON 


1. 


King's Chapel and Burial Grounc 


11. Custom House 


22. The Shell 


2. 


City Hail 


12. Paul Revere House 


23. Massachusetts General Hospital 


3. 


Granary Burial Ground 


13. Paul Revere Mall 


24. Public Library 


4. 


Athenaeum 


14. Christ Church 


25. Trinity 


5. 


Old Corner 


15. CoppsHill 


26. Christian Science Church 


6. 


Old South Meeting House 


16. Park St. Church 


27. Temple Israel 


7. 


Post Office 


17. St. Paul's Cathedral 


28. Symphony Hall 


8. 


Old State House 


18. State House 


29. Museum of Fine Arts 


9. 


Faneuil Hall 


19. Court House 


30. Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum 


10. 


Quincy Market 


20. Harrison Gray Otis House 

21. Old West Chutch 


31. Massachusetts Historical Society 



^